God told Adam and Eve in Genesis 2:17 not to eat of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. In Genesis 3:2,3 Eve tells the serpent that they can not eat or touch of the tree. She twisted God's words, or in this case, added to them.

Had Eve already sinned in her heart, causing her to misquote God's words and eating the fruit was just a manifestation of the sin? Or did the first sin of mankind occur a the point of eating the fruit, thus making misquoting Scripture out of ignorance not a sin?

Thoughts?

Views: 1244

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Reading Chapter two of the creation account leaves me the impression that God ONLY (capitalized for emphasis) told Adam that he couldn't eat from the knowledge of good and evil. This makes me think that it was Adam's, being the head of the  human race, responsibility to tell Eve.

It is possible that Adam told her what God said and then advised her not to even touch it. She, in turn, misunderstood Adam's advice and took it to mean that God also said that you couldn't touch it.

Then again, maybe, Adam is the one that misquoted God. Who knows?

Is misinterpreting a scripture a sin? I think it depends on the intent. If you purposely misinterpret in order to deceive, then, yes, I do believe it is a sin. If you misinterpret because of the way you have been taught, no, I don't think so. If you misinterpret with good intentions, then, no, I don't think it is a sin.

Hope this helps,

God Bless

Thanks for the comments.

Dt. 4:2; 12:32; and Rev. 22:18 state not to add or take away from God's Word. I understand the Deuteronomy passages refer to the law and Revelation is prophecy. If Adam was the one that miscommunicated (added to) God's words in communicating to Eve, is there any room for condemning Adam for this or was what he did acceptable out of plain ignorance?

I certainly don't want to split hairs, it was just some a friend and I were discussing and thought I would unpack it here a little more.

I, personally, don't think Adam added to God's words on purpose. He merely offered Eve advice. Like the best way not to yield to temptation is to avoid it.

If I'm wrong and Adam purposely added to God's word, then He would be at fault and I believe God would hold him accountable for it. I just can't see why Adam would purposely do something like that. What would be his motive?

Of course, all of this is speculation, since, the Bible doesn't give us anymore to go on, but, it is nice and interesting to discuss these things.

On another note, when Eve did eat and presented it to her husband, Adam, not being deceived, made the choice to eat the fruit. Thereby, choosing to be with Eve over being with God.

 

So then, is it a sin to say, "God ONLY told Adam that he could not EAT" from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil? Now where does the Bible state this idea. Actually this idea is added to the Scripture by inference from silence. It may be true, but it is not stated as such in the Scripture.

Are you sure that God did not also tell Adam that he should not touch it as well.

We need to hesitate before declaring something to be the case solely on the basis of the Bible's silence on the topic.

If in fact Adam had sinned by adding to God's word, then the eating of the tree would not have been the first sin of humans after all, right?

So then, is it a sin to say, "God ONLY told Adam that he could not EAT" from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil? Now where does the Bible state this idea.

I did not say that "God only told Adam that he could not eat". I said that it leaves me "with the impression" that "God only told Adam."

If God did also tell Adam that he should not touch it as well, why, doesn't the scripture say so? I think that it would be a very important thing to leave out, if it were so.

I agree that we need to be careful about basing something solely on the silence of a topic. But this is merely a friendly discussion on the subject of misinterpreting scripture. By no means are we trying to be Dogmatic about it. I apologize if I have a offended you with my remarks. Such was not my intent.

If in fact Adam had sinned by adding to God's word, then the eating of the tree would not have been the first sin of humans after all, right?

You make a very good point, sir. Agreed.


 

Jim,

This is the very thing I have been discussing with a friend. In a nutshell, we are trying to figure out what to make of Eve adding, misquoting, misinterpreting (whatever we are to call it) Scripture. I have always been taught (as many have, I'm sure) that the fall was the result of the eating of the fruit (a.k.a. disobeying God). Was there anything wrong with what Eve did in her misquote?  Had Eve already sinned in her heart, causing her to misquote God's words and eating the fruit was just a manifestation of the sin?

I am so sorry. I wasn't saying that you had said that. I was just asking the question about reading things into Scripture, no matter whether I did it or Billy Graham, or the Pastor of First Church.

Douglas Collins said:

I did not say that "God only told Adam that he could not eat". I said that it leaves me "with the impression" that "God only told Adam."

I agree that we need to be careful about basing something solely on the silence of a topic. But this is merely a friendly discussion on the subject of misinterpreting scripture. By no means are we trying to be Dogmatic about it. I apologize if I have a offended you with my remarks. Such was not my intent.

Again, I am sorry that I came across as faulting you. That was not at all my intent. We could give other examples of common assumptions about "What the Bible says," like, "Cleanliness is next to godliness," "God commands us to tithe," or "Jesus descended into hell," or "The Bible defines Pi as 3" and so on.

The first step in proper interpretation is to carefully observe what the Bible does actually say.

For example one brother keeps saying that God commanded Noah to take TWO OF EVERY SPECIES on the ark. But that just is not in there.

Then there are those who are quite sure that the Flood lasted forty days.

Are these misinterpretations "SIN?"

Personally, my answer to the question I asked, is NO IT IS NOT A SIN to be mistaken. And that is also my answer to the question of the opening post: Is misinterpreting Scripture a sin? NOT NECESSARILY. It depends on the heart and the motives, and the state of humility, and the willingness to be corrected. It depends on maturity and depth of knowledge. Hebrews addresses those who should know better, and John addresses differing levels of maturity.

Does the Bible indicate that Adam was deceived? No, the Bible says specifically that Adam was not deceived.

Does the Bible indicate what was the only defined requirement of God for Adam and Eve? THE ONE AND ONLY LAW which He gave them, with consequences? The first commandment with promises we all now. And we know also the first recorded commandment with consequences!

Does the Bible state anywhere what was the first sin of man?

What was it?

There is another verse which covers the whole Word of God

 

Proverbs 30:5-6

5 Every word of God is pure: he is a shield unto them that put their trust in him.

6 Add thou not unto his words, lest he reprove thee, and thou be found a liar.

 

 

It seems if you add to Gods word it must come from God, hence why there are prophets of God. If you add to God's words through man's philosophy then the chances are you will be found to be a liar thus sin.

Isaiah 2:22

22 Stop trusting in mere humans,

    who have but a breath in their nostrils.

    Why hold them in esteem?



Travis Smith said:

Thanks for the comments.

Dt. 4:2; 12:32; and Rev. 22:18 state not to add or take away from God's Word. I understand the Deuteronomy passages refer to the law and Revelation is prophecy. If Adam was the one that miscommunicated (added to) God's words in communicating to Eve, is there any room for condemning Adam for this or was what he did acceptable out of plain ignorance?

I certainly don't want to split hairs, it was just some a friend and I were discussing and thought I would unpack it here a little more.

Floyd,

How would you then apply that to the question at hand? Was there anything wrong with what Eve did in her misquote of Scripture in Genesis?

Well applying it to the quoted scriptures I would ask the following question?

When she was told “Ye shall not surely die” (Proverbs 30:5-6 adding to God's words) was she trusting what God said or the serpent?

It seems it boils down to trust. Once her trust was broken in God by taking the serpents word then what came out of the broken trust was the knowledge of sin i.e. knowing good and evil. It says she gave Adam to eat also (Genesis 3:6). When Adam saw the fruit he may have instinctively known it was from the tree that God said not to eat from. By then trust in God was broken.

They effectively inclined to their new found understanding that was not of God; hence they acted in accordance to their own understanding which manifested itself as trust in their human selves (Isaiah 2:22).



Travis Smith said:

Floyd,

How would you then apply that to the question at hand? Was there anything wrong with what Eve did in her misquote of Scripture in Genesis?

Eve did not misquote Scripture. Moreover, we cannot categorically state that she misquoted God. It is entirely assumption to say that she misquoted what God had said. It just is not in there.

How could Eve misquote Scripture when to our knowledge there was as yet not Scripture?

How could we know that Eve misquoted Scripture or that she misquoted God, unless there was a clear and definite statement somewhere in the Word of God that she had misquoted God.

I believe that she accurately represented to the adversary, the Old Serpent, precisely what God had told her. And how can anyone insist that God did not speak to her too? It doesn't say God spoke to her - true. But it is adding to the Scripture to say that GOD did NOT speak to her.

We must avoid imagining things that we think must have happened, when the Bible has not stated it expressly.

Travis Smith said:

Floyd,

How would you then apply that to the question at hand? Was there anything wrong with what Eve did in her misquote of Scripture in Genesis?

To say that "eve misquoted Scripture" is a perfect example of stating something as a matter of fact that is not anywhere stated in the text before us. That seems to me to be more an example of a "misquote of Scripture," than what is being said about Eve. The case under discussion, and the hermeneutic being applied to it, is a very pointed example of the very topic of this thread.

Misinterpreting Scripture is a mistake.

Misinterpreting Scripture because we believe the word of another above the word of God is sin.

Misinterpreting Scripture because we think God is not being straight with us is sin.

The fact of the matter is that the sin which God addressed in His question to Adam and Eve was the SIN  of eating of the Tree. Hast thou eaten of the tree. . . ?

You were always taught that this was the original sin because it is what the Scripture teaches.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

About CC

Connecting Christians who believe in Biblical Creation — discussing beliefs, sharing ideas, and recommending evolution-free resources. Please keep all posts relevant to the topics of this community.

Rules of Engagement
Zero Tolerance Policy
Statement of Faith
Creation Terms
FAQ

Homeschool Curriculum

Members

Creation Conversations 2018

What's new @ CC for 2018? 

Creation networking and much more in store for Creation Conversation Members. You'll not want to miss this new year!

© 2019   Created by Creation Conversations.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service