You've read many resources on the Biblical account of Creation and the authority of the Bible over time that impacted your study and ministry. Creation Conversations would like to compile a list of your favorite resources and share them here and with others online. Please add your favorite in the comment section below and why you recommend it.

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I have two resources that I recommend on the Biblical account of Creation. These books use the Bible (KJV) as reference and they are comprise of studies I did from the Bible. (Biblical Cryptozoology: Revealed Cryptids of the Bible and DAYS OF GENESIS)

John Woodmorappe's "Noah's Ark: A Feasibility Study" is one of the best creationist books ever published. It would be hard to significantly expand on the work Woodmorappe did on that subject.

"The New Creationism" by Paul Garner didn't stay in print very long, but it is the book I recommend to people for an overview of modern young-earth views and models

The RATE Books represent the most ambitious creationist research project to date, and I believe they should set a standard for future YEC research, so I will include them among my favorite creationist resources.

Finally, this article is a thus-far unmatched resource in creationist literature on young earth evidence: http://creation.com/age-of-the-earth

There are so many excellent books that I could post here, but most of them focus on only one aspect of Biblical Creation, etc.  The Answers Books, however, cover nearly everything.  Of course, books covering so broad a range of topics sacrifice some detail, but these books are fairly thorough though concise.  For anybody that doesn't have them, The Answers Book 1,2, and 3 are great resources.

Fully in the mainstream, with continuous current updates on evolution/creation in news:

http://crev.info/ (Creation Evolution Headlines)

Also: Creation Ministries International (Wieland, Bates, et al), who published my article on warm weather penguins

http://creation.com/warm-climate-penguins

Creation Today (Kent Hovind's son, Eric, and Joe Taylor - formerly AiG UK)

http://www.creationtoday.org/

And:The ministry built around the work of Dr. Henry Morris

http://www.icr.org/

H O W E V E R : : ! ! !

Mainstream creationist ministries are great, but there are a few that are sometimes considered taboo, that I still sneak a peak at:

http://www.creationism.org/swift/index.htm

http://www.dinosaursandman.com/ (Dennis Swift)

Joe Taylor:

http://www.mtblanco.com/

I keep going back to this link genesis-verse-by-verse  alternatively http://creation.com/genesis-verse-by-verse

I'm a fan of the Answers books, and Dr. Jason Lisle's Ultimate Proof of Creation/Discerning Truth. For the most part, I have enough resources for myself. What I've been looking for is more materials for my kids ages 1, 3 and 5. A is for Adam is all we seem to have right now.

My little brother loves the "Marvels of Creation" series by Buddy and Kay Davis.  If I remember correctly, we bought him the first book, Magnificent Mammals, when he was three, and he really enjoyed the photographs.  Now we have the other two books and he enjoys them as well.
 
Robert Gerald Barnett said:

I'm a fan of the Answers books, and Dr. Jason Lisle's Ultimate Proof of Creation/Discerning Truth. For the most part, I have enough resources for myself. What I've been looking for is more materials for my kids ages 1, 3 and 5. A is for Adam is all we seem to have right now.

I encountered a guy today that believes in relativism. When I tried to point out the contradictions in it, he quickly claimed it was completely situation dependant because everyone had a different view on it. I've been researching the topic and could use a book or series of articles to give me plenty of counter arguments for the possible different directions.

Does enjoying the pictures in a book really count as teaching the material? That's almost like paying extra for a child to color in pictures of a Disney character vs paying less for a generic picture. I don't meant to be all about the money, but I'm hoping that the extra $ investment would help the child learn the material, too. Again, maybe I'm not realistic for children so young. I know public schools are teaching millions of years/evolution to younger children these days, my concern is being able to prepare mine so that they won't get brainwashed when they are introduced to it.

It's my fear that by the time I can communicate the truth about dinosaurs and the age of the earth and such, my oldest won't immediately deny it because school taught him otherwise. I have tried but he doesn't seem to understand, hence looking for materials I can try to teach him with.


 
David Thomas Posey said:

My little brother loves the "Marvels of Creation" series by Buddy and Kay Davis.  If I remember correctly, we bought him the first book, Magnificent Mammals, when he was three, and he really enjoyed the photographs.  Now we have the other two books and he enjoys them as well.
 
Robert Gerald Barnett said:

I'm a fan of the Answers books, and Dr. Jason Lisle's Ultimate Proof of Creation/Discerning Truth. For the most part, I have enough resources for myself. What I've been looking for is more materials for my kids ages 1, 3 and 5. A is for Adam is all we seem to have right now.

I mentioned the pictures because my brother at that time preferred photographs to drawings, but every child is different I reckon.  Since he couldn't read, we told him what we felt it was important to know about what the text said, just like we did with any book.  
 
Robert Gerald Barnett said:

Does enjoying the pictures in a book really count as teaching the material? That's almost like paying extra for a child to color in pictures of a Disney character vs paying less for a generic picture. I don't meant to be all about the money, but I'm hoping that the extra $ investment would help the child learn the material, too. Again, maybe I'm not realistic for children so young. I know public schools are teaching millions of years/evolution to younger children these days, my concern is being able to prepare mine so that they won't get brainwashed when they are introduced to it.

It's my fear that by the time I can communicate the truth about dinosaurs and the age of the earth and such, my oldest won't immediately deny it because school taught him otherwise. I have tried but he doesn't seem to understand, hence looking for materials I can try to teach him with.


 
David Thomas Posey said:

My little brother loves the "Marvels of Creation" series by Buddy and Kay Davis.  If I remember correctly, we bought him the first book, Magnificent Mammals, when he was three, and he really enjoyed the photographs.  Now we have the other two books and he enjoys them as well.
 
Robert Gerald Barnett said:

I'm a fan of the Answers books, and Dr. Jason Lisle's Ultimate Proof of Creation/Discerning Truth. For the most part, I have enough resources for myself. What I've been looking for is more materials for my kids ages 1, 3 and 5. A is for Adam is all we seem to have right now.

Dear Jennifer

This is not exactly what you ask for, but here is a list of books some people may find useful.

The God Diagnosis by Grerg E. Viehman, M.D. ; The Case for Christ by Lee Strobel;  The New Evidence That Demands a Verdict by Josh McDowell; Genetic Entropy by John Sanford;  Evolution Exposed by Paul Humber; A Skeptic's Search for God and Can You Trust the Bible? by Ralph O. Muncaster; The Ultimate Proof of Creation and Discerning Truth and Logic / Faith by Jason Lisle;  Bones of Contention by Marvin Lubenow; Shattering the Myths of Darwiism by Richard Milton; The Greatest Hoax On Earth

by Jonathan Sarfati; Signature in the Cell by Stephen Meyer; Slaughter of the Dissidents and The Dark Side of Charles Darwin by Jerry Bergman; Dismantling the Big Bang by Alex Williams and John Hartnett; Starlight, Time and the New Physics by John Hartnett;: From Darwin to Hitler by Richard Weikart; Without Excuse by Werner Gitt; Secrets of the Sixth Edition by Randall Hedtke;   Nonsense of a High Order by Rabbi Moshe Averick; Dragons or Dinosaurs? by Darek Isaacs; Icons of Evolution by Jonathan Wells; Thousands...Not Billions by Don DeYoung; Evolution: A Theory in Crisis by Michael Denton; Tornado in a Junkyard by James Perloff; Old-Earth Creationism on Trial by Tim Chaffey and Jason Lisle; In Six Days edited by John Ashton; God and Evolution edited by Jay Richards; Not by Chance by Lee Spetner; That Their Words May Be Used Against Them by Henry Morris;

Darwin's Black Box and The Edge of Evolution by Michael Behe; The Mystery of Life's Origin by Charles Thaxton, Walter Bradley and Roger Olsen; Persuaded by the Evidence editors Doug Sharp and Jerry Bergman; The Puzzle of Ancient Man by Donald Chittick; Search for the Truth by Bruce Malone.

Best Regards   Robert Buckman

 

 

 

 

I own most of these; good selection for adults and teens (I started collecting as a teen). They are excellent resources, and lately I've found myself buying their ebook versions and sometimes replacing my hardcopy with the digital version and giving the hard copy away.

As time goes on, my kids are getting into books more and more. My 5 year old is slllooowwwwly learning to read. Right now I've been going through Buddy Davis' "When dragon's hearts were good" and they've been enjoying the pictures as David described.

 

It is my hope and prayer that I can communicate basic things (Jesus, dinos, etc) to them before secular education indoctrinates them. One reason I keep so many resources around is so that when certain questions come up, I'll at least have those resources to find my family the answers. If I remember correctly (and I have a TERRIBLE memory) that's a large reason why ministries like AiG exist.

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